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Confronting the Myths of No Child Left Behind

Supporters of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law use many arguments to defend the controversial law. The strongest-sounding arguments have little to do with the law’s actual provisions, while others are simply false. We have prepared this fact sheet to help people reply to the various claims made in defense of NCLB; sort, pick and adapt the points you need. 


All children can learn to high levels.

Forum on Educational Accountability Successful in its Efforts to Improve the Higher Education Act

Contact: Gary Ratner
Executive Director, Citizens for Effective Schools
301 469-8000                               

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Forum on Educational Accountability Successful in its Efforts to Improve the Higher Education Act, P.L. 110-315

What the Presidential Candidates are saying about NCLB

The Presidential Candidates on NCLB – Update, October 2008

With just two months until the presidential election, the Democratic and Republican parties have had their respective conventions and produced party platforms, which gives us an opportunity to see if the candidates are saying anything new about NCLB. The short answer is, nothing very specific. Independent candidate Ralph Nader, on the other hand, specifically calls for the law’s repeal. Libertarian Bob Barr and other candidates have also weighed in on the law since our last update in June.

FairTest Article on NCLB in AFSC journal Peacework

FairTest Article on NCLB in AFSC journal Peacework:

 The September issue of Peacework focues on education activism, providing a rich set of resources for parents, educators, students and other activists. FairTest's Monty Neill's lead article focuses on overhauling federal law (at http://www.peaceworkmagazine.org/beyond-no-child-left-behind). Issue contents are summarized below. You can read all the articles on the web at http://www.peaceworkmagazine.org/.

Video: "FairTest: You Can't Judge Learning with a Standardized Test"

High Stakes Tests Do Not Improve Student Learning

High Stakes Tests Do Not Improve Student Learning

A FairTest Report by Monty Neill, Acting Executive Director
January 1998

A common assumption of standards and tests-based school reform is that high-stakes testing, such as having to pass an exam for high school graduation, will produce improved learning outcomes. This view is found in the grading formula used in Quality Counts (1998), the recent Education Week report in which states receive points for having high-stakes tests.

Summary of Proposed Legislative Changes to ESEA/NCLB Press Release

Forum on Educational Accountability

Summary of Proposed Legislative Changes
to ESEA/NCLB

EDUCATION, CIVIL RIGHTS, DISABILITY, RELIGIOUS GROUPS PROMOTE "REDEFINING ACCOUNTABILITY" TO REPLACE "NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND" FOCU

Forum on Educational Accountability

for further information:
Sara Robertson (202) 230-8978 Robert Schaeffer (239)
395-6773
Dr. Monty Neill (617) 335-2115
EDUCATION, CIVIL RIGHTS, DISABILITY,
RELIGIOUS GROUPS PROMOTE "REDEFINING ACCOUNTABILITY"
TO REPLACE "NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND" FOCUS ON TESTS AND
SANCTIONS;

Summary of Proposed Legislative Changes to ESEA/NCLB

Forum on Educational Accountability


March 2007

The current version of the federal Elementary and Secondary
Education Act (ESEA), called "No Child Left Behind"
(NCLB), needs fundamental change. The Forum on Educational Accountability
(FEA) has submitted legislative language based on the Joint Organizational
Statement on NCLB to the U.S. House and Senate Education Committees
that would remake the law into an effective tool for school improvement.

“No Child Left Behind” After Six Years: An Escalating Track Record of Failure

After six years, there is overwhelming evidence that the deeply flawed “No Child Left Behind” law (NCLB) is doing more harm than good in our nation’s public schools. NCLB’s test-and-punish approach to school reform relies on limited, one-size-fits-all tools that reduce education to little more than test prep. It produces unfair decisions and requires unproven, often irrational "solutions" to complex problems. NCLB is clearly underfunded, but fully funding a bad law is not a solution.

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