Resistance Guide: Organizing for Testing Reform

  • See our one page fact sheet, 8 Steps to Work for Testing Reform, HERE; and its companion infographic, HERE.
     
  • Sign the National Resolution Against High-Stakes Testing – and get other organizations and individuals to sign it.
     
  • Share information privately and in public; distribute fact sheets; write letters to the editor; use social media; hold rallies and demonstrations. Share information with parents, teachers, students, community members.
     
  • Organize a community meeting or forum. Community meetings and forums are powerful tools for educating, organizing and mobilizing parents, students, teachers and other community members.
     
  • Opt your child out of testing (boycott). Opting Out is one of the most powerful expressions of opposition. For more information, click here
     
  • Build alliances to other groups. Reach out to teacher unions and other education organizations; parent and student groups; community, civil rights and faith-based groups; labor unions; civic associations; business groups. Also see FairTest's Assessment Reform Network Pages for tips.
     
  • Media.Use different forms of media to get the message out, build support, persuade policymakers. For ideas and assistance on media work, click HERE.
     
  • Contact your senators and representatives.
    • To contact your US Senators and Representatives, click HERE.
    • Tell your Congresspeople they need to overhaul NCLB/ESEA – to find out more about the law and needed changes, click HERE.
    • Talk to candidates for office - get to them when they are most likely to be listening.
       
  • Support authentic assessment and accountability – To win change, activists must offer proposals for better assessment systems—systems that help improve teaching and learning instead of narrowing curriculum and punishing students, teachers and schools-- coupled with demands to end harmful practices. For ideas, examples, evidence, click HERE.
     
  • University Admissions Reform. To find a list of colleges that have “test-score optional” admissions, plus other information on SAT, ACT and more, click here.
     
  • The Testing Resistance and Reform Movement: A FairTest Report (2014)
     
  • Testing Reform Victories: The First Wave (2014)