k-12

What is the "No Child Left Behind" Law?

What is the "No Child Left Behind" Law?

The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is a federal law that provides money for extra educational assistance for poor children in return for improvements in their academic progress. NCLB is the most recent version of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

States set educational proficiency level

Under the U. S. constitution, states have the primary responsibility for public education. However, if states want to receive federal NCLB funds, they must agree to the law's requirements to:

A FairTest Position Statement on NCLB

Why “No Child Left Behind”

Will Fail Our Children

A FairTest Position Statement on
NCLB

 
“No Child Left Behind,” the name of the federal
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, describes a worthy goal
for our nation. Tragically, the legislation will exacerbate,
not solve, the real problems that cause many children to be left
behind.

What's Wrong with Graduation and Promotion Tests

"High-stakes" tests are exams used to make important decisions about students, such as graduation or grade promotion. Decades of research shows the key reasons why test scores should never be the determining factor in making major decisions about students:

Students with Disabilities Report Executive Summary: Preliminary Findings March 2004

Executive Summary:
Preliminary Findings March 2004

[ FairTest copied this from another website, failed to capture the title, the file is no longer on the website that is noted at the end of this document.]

This Executive Summary of Preliminary Findings incorporates
the June 2003 Preliminary Findings. All data are for the 2000-2001
school year.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Proposition 227 and Skyrocketing Test Scores: An Urban Legend from California

Proposition 227 and Skyrocketing Test
Scores: An Urban Legend from California

Stephen Krashen
The Journal of the Texas Association for Bilingual Education (in
press)

SELECTED ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON LANGUAGE MINORITY ASSESSMENT

SELECTED ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON
LANGUAGE MINORITY ASSESSMENT
1995

Ascher, C. "Testing Bilingual Students: Do We Speak
the Same Language?" PTA Today (March 1991, pp. 7-9).

Discusses cultural and linguistic bias issues in bilingual
testing, options for administering tests to bilingual students,
and problems associated with these options. Includes a short
description of an alternative, "dynamic assessment."

Standards Yes, Standardization No

Deborah Meier

Raising the Scores, Ruining the Schools

Alfie Kohn

All of us, as parents and citizens, want to make sure our schools
are doing a good job and our children are learning. Unfortunately,
the MCAS exams-and the "tougher standards" philosophy
that they reflect-not only fail to provide meaningful information
but actually interfere with the goal of providing students with
a high-quality education.

The High Stake of High-Stakes Testing

The High Stake of High-Stakes Testing

Dave Orphal
Teacher
Zoe Barnum High School
orphald@eurekacityschools.org

Abstract

This article first appeared in Alternative Network Journal.

The Dangerous Consequences of High-Stakes Standardized Testing

Tests are called "high-stakes" when they used to make major decisions about a student, such as high school graduation or grade promotion. To be high stakes, a test has to be very important in the decision process or be able to override other information (for example, a student does not graduate if s/he does not pass the test regardless of how well s/he did in school). Currently, 17 states require students to pass a test to graduate, and 7 more are planning such tests.

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