k-12

A Learner-Centered School Accountability Model: An Alternative to High Stakes Testing

 

Ken Jones

First, Do No Harm: A Response to the Proposed New York City Third Grade Retention Policy

[A Note from FairTest: this report focuses on New York City, but contains strong arguments and a good set of references.]Institute for Education & Social Policy Steinhardt School of Education New York University and National Center for Schools and Communities Fordham UniversityMarch 2004

How the Stanford 9 Test Institutionalizes Unequal Education

By ALEX CAPUTO-PEARL

"How to Improve High-Stakes Test Scores Without Really Improving"

by Richard L. Allington, Ph.D., University of Florida, in Issues in Education: Contributions from Educational Psychology. Adapted by CalCARE and FairTest.

Here are twelve strategies that have been used to improve test scores without improving achievement, as reported in research reports and media accounts:
1. Alter the answer sheets (cheat). Change kids' wrong answers to right ones. Or tell kids to only answer the questions they know and leave the rest blank. Then fill in the right answers for them.

"Meeting the Standards Will Not Guarantee Success"


Arnold Packer, SCANS 2000 Center,
The Johns Hopkins University
The High School Assessments Forum
Tuesday, October 21, 2003
Oakland Mills Interfaith Center

 

Thank you for the opportunity to come here today.

Standardized Tests Flunk Common Sense 101

San Francisco Examiner Monday, Aug 23, 1999

By Caroline Grannan
SPECIAL TO THE EXAMINER

Exposing the Myths of High Stakes Testing

by Angela Engel

Performance Assessment Schools Meet High Standards Without High-Stakes Regents Tests. That's the Truth! What are the Myths?

 

MYTH 1: If some schools administer performance assessments instead of Regents exams, all schools will want to use the same "escape hatch."

TRUTH: Rather than being an "escape hatch," performance assessment tasks, as used by the New York Performance Standards Consortium, are more challenging than Regents exams. In fact, tasks such as the literary essay, the original science experiment and the research paper not only meet, but exceed state standards.

What You Need to Know About California's High Stakes Tests

What are 'high stakes' tests?

These are tests mandated by law whose scores are
used as the basis for distributing rewards and punish-ments to students, teachers, schools, and school administrators.

What happens to students who fail tests?

The Truth About the SOLs

The Virginia Board of Education says that:

The SOL program will improve public education by holding everyone to high standards through high-stakes testing.

Syndicate content