k-12

"Meeting the Standards Will Not Guarantee Success"


Arnold Packer, SCANS 2000 Center,
The Johns Hopkins University
The High School Assessments Forum
Tuesday, October 21, 2003
Oakland Mills Interfaith Center

 

Thank you for the opportunity to come here today.

Standardized Tests Flunk Common Sense 101

San Francisco Examiner Monday, Aug 23, 1999

By Caroline Grannan
SPECIAL TO THE EXAMINER

Exposing the Myths of High Stakes Testing

by Angela Engel

Performance Assessment Schools Meet High Standards Without High-Stakes Regents Tests. That's the Truth! What are the Myths?

 

MYTH 1: If some schools administer performance assessments instead of Regents exams, all schools will want to use the same "escape hatch."

TRUTH: Rather than being an "escape hatch," performance assessment tasks, as used by the New York Performance Standards Consortium, are more challenging than Regents exams. In fact, tasks such as the literary essay, the original science experiment and the research paper not only meet, but exceed state standards.

What You Need to Know About California's High Stakes Tests

What are 'high stakes' tests?

These are tests mandated by law whose scores are
used as the basis for distributing rewards and punish-ments to students, teachers, schools, and school administrators.

What happens to students who fail tests?

The Truth About the SOLs

The Virginia Board of Education says that:

The SOL program will improve public education by holding everyone to high standards through high-stakes testing.

The Learning Record, an Assessment System Plus a Classroom Record Keeping Tool

The Learning Record is an open system of literacy and mathematics assessment, K-12, maintained and monitored by the classroom teacher to provide evidence that students are moving toward agreed upon goals and standards. Parents (and/or other adult mentors) and students themselves contribute evidence for the Record. Teachers summarize and record this information to inform their teaching and to calibrate their interpretations of the standards with others beyond the classroom for accountability purposes.

The Learning Record

The Learning Record is a powerful assessment process developed first in England for literacy (reading, writing, speaking, listening) for use with low-income children, many of whom had first languages other than English. For years, U.S. work on the LR was led by the Center for Language in Learning, but sadly it has closed its doors.

Fortunately, all the materials to use the LR, K-12 and college, are available on the web at http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~syverson/olr/olr.html.

Chicago School Reform: Lessons for the Nation

January 2007
Executive Summary

 

Download a print formated PDF of this executive summary.

Download a print formated PDF of the complete report.

 

Principles and Indicators for Student Assessment Systems

National Forum on Assessment

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