fact sheets

FairTest responds to the Administration's dangerous "flexibility" proposals to change NCLB.

In "From the Frying Pan to the Fire While Adding Gasoline," FairTest
responds to the Administration's dangerous "flexibility" proposals to
change NCLB.

Fact Sheet: "Tests, Cheating and Educational Corruption"

Racial Justice and Standardized Educational Testing

Fact Sheet: A Better Way to Evaluate Schools (PDF)

“A Better Way to Evaluate Schools” outlines a 3-part school evaluation system – school quality reviews, limited standardized testing, plus school-based and local evidence.

NCLB and Assessing Bilingual Students

Click below for the PDF

Fact Sheet: Multiple Measures: A Definition and Examples from the U.S. and Other Nations

Multiple Measures: A Definition and Examples from the U.S. and Other Nations

Summary

Definition. Multiple measures: the use of multiple indicators and sources of evidence of student learning, of varying kinds, gathered at multiple points in time, within and across subject areas.

How Testing Feeds the School-to-Prison Pipeline

(note: this fact sheet is available for download as a print-formatted PDF file)

Recommendations for Overhauling ESEA/NCLB

The Forum on Educational Accountability has released its 2010 recommendations for the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), currently named “No Child Left Behind.” FEA prepared this summary of the recommendations. (PDF file)

Position Paper on Assessment for Learning

from the Third International Conference on Assessment for Learning

Dunedin, New Zealand, March 2009

(NOTE: For a formated printable PDF of this document click here.)

Paying Teachers for Student Test Scores Damages Schools and Undermines Learning

NOTE: for a PDF formatted version of this fact sheet click here)

Independent researchers have found that evaluating and paying teachers for test scores is either damaging or irrelevant to improved learning.*  Unfortunately, even evidence of harm does not seem to affect the growing popularity of such schemes. Policymakers, including U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, should stop promoting this failed approach.

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